You must be nominated to stand as a candidate.

Criteria to be nominated to stand as a candidate

You must meet one of the statutory qualifications:

  • You are, and will continue to be, registered as a local government elector for the local authority area in which you wish to stand from the day of your nomination onwards.
  • You have occupied as owner or tenant any land or other premises in the local authority area during the whole of the 12 months before the day of your nomination and the day of election.
  • Your main or only place of work during the 12 months prior to the day of your nomination and the day of election has been in the local authority area.
  • You have lived in the local authority area during the whole of the 12 months before the day of your nomination and the day of election.

What is in a candidate nomination pack

The pack includes:

  • your nomination papers
  • information about the election, including deadlines, nomination submission rules and a timetable of key events.

Your nomination papers

Candidates should read the accompanying notes in the candidate's pack carefully before completion of the forms to avoid unnecessary delays.

The nomination form is a legal document and information entered can be challenged in a court of law.

What a councillor does

The aim of a local councillor is to make their local area a better place to live and work.

The role of a councillor is valuable to local communities and has a broad range of responsibilities. A large part of a councillor role is the work they do at neighbourhood level, bringing together individuals and agencies in their ward, from the public, private and voluntary community sectors.

They act as community leaders to encourage participation in local life. A ward councillor can gather people's views and represent them at council meetings. This is a way of ensuring that service providers are accountable to service users, deliver quality and value for money.

More about being a councillor: